Apr 25 2012: The Modernist Christ (Geraint Evans Sings in Llandaff Cathedral, Delyse Records, 1962)

I suppose this record sleeve, containing a 1962 recording of Welsh opera singer Geraint Evans performing in the imposing setting  of Llandaff Cathedral, might be seen to connect to yesterday’s post, in which the graphics of generic Soviet LP covers of a similar era were featured. While specifically designed for this one particular release, the … Continue reading

Apr 17 2012: Two Illustrations Showing the Atom and its Nucleus from The Boys’ Book of Radio, Television and Radar (Burke, 1957)

Following yesterday’s sequence of advertising pages from Atomics Magazine (1956) these two images cut to the heart of what all that hardware was in pursuit of: the latent power of the atom itself and its nucleus, as expressed through Einstein’s E equals MC squared equation (surely one of very few equations to be known outside … Continue reading

Apr 16 2012: Eight Kitsch Dream Images by Salvador Dali (Coronet Magazine, 1950)

Coronet magazine seems to have been, in format and approach, an attempt to imitate the success of Reader’s Digest. In among its pages of amusing anecdotes, abridged stories and other human interest material fairly typical of its time, however, are some intriguing advertisements and a definite curveball, given the journal’s otherwise rather conservative idiom, in … Continue reading

Mar 28 2012: Sepia-Toned Monochrome Photograph Showing A Swarm Of Bees (Date Unknown)

This undated image of bees swarming has hung around my desk for several years now, pretty much since I found it inside the pages of an old encyclopaedia sometime around 2006. What it shows is both commonplace, insofar as bees form swarms regularly: the sight of one isn’t an everyday occurance, but nor is it … Continue reading

Mar 10 2012: A View Of The Thames Looking Towards Tower Bridge Showing Bomb Sites (c.1940s)

There’s something hugely compelling about this undated photograph, which at first glance shows a very familiar view along the River Thames, looking towards Tower Bridge, but on slightly closer inspection reveals some very unfamiliar bomb-sites and gutted buildings in the foreground. The photographer is not identified, but it’s presumably an amateur snap taken from a … Continue reading

Feb 23 2012: Thirteen Abstract and Illustrated Dustjackets from Scientific Book Club Editions (1958 – 1962)

A large collection of these Scientific Book Club editions, dating from the later 1950s and early 1960s, appeared one Sunday morning at the Colwick car boot sale in Nottingham, and covered many more subjects than are represented here. The truth is, while the books were plentiful, some selection was necessary in order to carry those chosen … Continue reading

Feb 21 2012: The Cimex Invasion: Top Secret (Cimex Industrial Marketing 45, 1960s)

I don’t know if the BBC Radiophonic Workshop (or, at least, one of its associates) was involved in the making of the various electronic sounds that feature on this undated (probably mid to late 1960s) promotional 45 for an industrial cleaning company, but the sounds it uses certainly fit the template established by the likes … Continue reading

Jan 29 2012: Thirty Five Photographs from Military Technology Magazine (1982)

In 1982, when the issues of Military Technology magazine from which these images were scanned appeared, the traditional manufacturing of the UK and elsewhere was being allowed to decline steeply, while the kinds of manufacturing seen here – generally of electronic and automated systems for military applications – was receiving a very large boost in … Continue reading

Mark McGowan’s Where’s Daddy’s Pig? (Trade Gallery, 2013)

You could probably argue that there’s no real reason to visit Where’s Daddy’s Pig?, the Mark McGowan exhibition that’s been running at Trade Gallery since May, on the grounds that everything it contains is already part of his own ARTIST TAXI DRIVER YouTube channel, where McGowan regularly posts campaigning rants (and occasionally more subdued musings) … Continue reading

Nov 11 2011: Adrift In The Stratosphere by Professor A.M. Low (Abbey Rewards, c.1942)

Aside from the fact that Professor A.M. Low sounds suspiciously like a made-up name, perhaps with a satirical poke at the quality of the pseudo-scientific notions put forth by the potboiler SF novel it adorns in mind, this is a fairly typical production line space thriller, knocking off a bit of Flash Gordon and a … Continue reading